jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.
Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.
casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.
Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

#and it focused on female friendships!!! her best friends were never less than her!! and older female best friends!! and didn’t pit her against vivian but had them grow into close friends!!#THE MOST IMPORTANT FEMINIST MEDIA OF OUR TIME
Zoom Info
jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.
Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.
casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.
Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

#and it focused on female friendships!!! her best friends were never less than her!! and older female best friends!! and didn’t pit her against vivian but had them grow into close friends!!#THE MOST IMPORTANT FEMINIST MEDIA OF OUR TIME
Zoom Info
jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.
Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.
casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.
Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

#and it focused on female friendships!!! her best friends were never less than her!! and older female best friends!! and didn’t pit her against vivian but had them grow into close friends!!#THE MOST IMPORTANT FEMINIST MEDIA OF OUR TIME
Zoom Info
jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.
Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.
casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.
Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

#and it focused on female friendships!!! her best friends were never less than her!! and older female best friends!! and didn’t pit her against vivian but had them grow into close friends!!#THE MOST IMPORTANT FEMINIST MEDIA OF OUR TIME
Zoom Info

jessicachastains:

twofishies:

lightspeedsound:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

#remember how this movie took female stereotypes and crushed them into a million pieces

casual reminder that Elle Woods scored a 179 on the LSAT, which is one point shy of a perfect score.

Casual reminder that Whatshisface here had family connections and was a legacy and shit, whereas Elle Woods came out of nowhere.

casual reminder that Elle Woods actually had an amazing background in real life issues that people dismissed as unimportant but managed to not only learn the law, but learned how to apply the law.

Casual reminder that Elle Woods used her lawyer skills to save a woman from an abusive relationship and also save another woman from trumped up murder charges and basically what I’m saying is you go, girl, go get ‘em Elle Woods, thank you for this movie.

what’s fantastic about this movie is that it’s not that fucked up brand of feminism where the girls who arent like other girls and sip tea and read hemingway look down on the blonde party sluts. the message of the movie is like, you can be blonde and attractive AND enjoy stuff like shopping and partying and you can still be smart and kick ass!!!

allthingslinguistic:

languagesarerad:

cloudplusone:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.
She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.
"No… They don’t, actually."
"And how do you communicate, then?"
"Talking?"
"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"
"It is, sometimes."
"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.
But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”
It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.
i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.
little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

I would be shocked but honestly this is just disheartening. Knowing my parents and how they are with my disabilities I can imagine a lot would be like this.

This very good piece about Cognitive Development in Deaf Children (Rachel Mayberry, McGill) talks about the large numbers of deaf & HoH children whose families do not learn sign.
It also discusses children who are not taught to sign until almost adolescence (as a ‘last resort’ when it becomes clear that they severely lack communication skills otherwise) and the further reaching implications of lacking accessible linguistic input from a young age. 
I recommend giving it a read if you are interested in knowing more!

Linguists are definitely on the side of signing to deaf and hard of hearing children as soon as caregivers realize that they’re deaf/HoH: a recent policy paper by Humphries et al. points out that having a strong foundation in a sign language makes it easier to learn a spoken language, rather than just not having any solid first language at all, and describes some of the steps that they’ve taken to make the public and especially parents aware of this. 
Here’s the abstract, but the full text is here and very much worth sharing:  

Parents of small deaf children need guidance on constructing home and school environments that affect normal language acquisition. They often turn to physicians and spiritual leaders and, increasingly, the internet. These sources can be underinformed about crucial issues, such as matters of brain plasticity connected to the risk of linguistic deprivation, and delay or disruption in the development of cognitive skills interwoven with linguistic ability. 
We have formed a team of specialists in education, linguistics, pediatric medicine, and psychology, and at times specialists in theology and in law have joined our group. We argue that deaf children should be taught a sign language in the early years. This does not preclude oral-aural training and assistive technology. With a strong first language (a sign language), the child can become bilingual (with the written form of the ambient spoken language and, perhaps, the spoken form), accruing the benefits of bilingualism. 
We have published in medical journals, addressing primary care physicians, in a journal with a spiritual-leader readership, and in a health-law journal. Articles in progress address medical educators and practitioners. Team members present findings at conferences, work on lobbying and legislative efforts with the National Association of the Deaf, and spread the word at conferences of target audiences. We share our work in Word format, so that anyone can easily appropriate it for our common interests. One of our articles has been downloaded over 27,000 times (as of April 2014), and we are asked to consult with committees in other countries as they draft national policies.

Bilingualism: it’s something that kids are totally capable of, although it’s hard to realize this if you’re a monolingual adult. 

allthingslinguistic:

languagesarerad:

cloudplusone:

l0kasenna:

officialnatasharomanoff:

slecnaztemnot:

nmscares:

#DidYouKnow #Deaf #DeafAwareness #education #SignLanguage #advocacy #NMSCares

This is actually sadly relevant. I had a lecture this summer about sign languages and Deaf culture and when I was finished, one hearing girl from the audience stayed behind to ask me some more question.

She asked me: “And your parents use sign language, right?” Like it was the most obvious thing in the world and why is she even asking this, of course my parents must know sign language.

"No… They don’t, actually."

"And how do you communicate, then?"

"Talking?"

"But… isn’t that complicated for you?"

"It is, sometimes."

"They probably didn’t have time for it…" she said. And I haven’t the heart to tell her that my father was offered sign language courses several times, that I offered to teach them some signs and that they always refused.

But I did told her: “It is not that rare. Most of deaf people I know have hearing parents who don’t sign.”

It’s the sad truth. People are willing to pay for surgeries to “repair” their children, but they are not willing to learn something to communicate with them.

i’d like to add onto this with my own personal experience, too. i was born hearing, but as soon as i was diagnosed as HoH, my parents didn’t do anything to learn ASL. they were quick to put me in classes, but they wouldn’t when i suggested to them that they take the classes with me so that we could learn.

i’ve tried to teach my mom how to sign numerous times, but she always says that “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” to which i tell her that she can learn, she just doesn’t want to. which is true. neither of my parents want to learn how to sign, but they want me to be able to hear perfectly so they don’t have to repeat themselves.

little do they know that their frustration with me not being able to hear them would be solved if they would just learn how to sign. maybe signing something to me once instead of repeating themselves four times and then getting mad would be more beneficial.

I’m absolutely shocked at this, it’s never crossed my mind that many parents wouldn’t even try to meet their hard of hearing kids halfway.

I would be shocked but honestly this is just disheartening. Knowing my parents and how they are with my disabilities I can imagine a lot would be like this.

This very good piece about Cognitive Development in Deaf Children (Rachel Mayberry, McGill) talks about the large numbers of deaf & HoH children whose families do not learn sign.

It also discusses children who are not taught to sign until almost adolescence (as a ‘last resort’ when it becomes clear that they severely lack communication skills otherwise) and the further reaching implications of lacking accessible linguistic input from a young age. 

I recommend giving it a read if you are interested in knowing more!

Linguists are definitely on the side of signing to deaf and hard of hearing children as soon as caregivers realize that they’re deaf/HoH: a recent policy paper by Humphries et al. points out that having a strong foundation in a sign language makes it easier to learn a spoken language, rather than just not having any solid first language at all, and describes some of the steps that they’ve taken to make the public and especially parents aware of this. 

Here’s the abstract, but the full text is here and very much worth sharing:  

Parents of small deaf children need guidance on constructing home and school environments that affect normal language acquisition. They often turn to physicians and spiritual leaders and, increasingly, the internet. These sources can be underinformed about crucial issues, such as matters of brain plasticity connected to the risk of linguistic deprivation, and delay or disruption in the development of cognitive skills interwoven with linguistic ability.

We have formed a team of specialists in education, linguistics, pediatric medicine, and psychology, and at times specialists in theology and in law have joined our group. We argue that deaf children should be taught a sign language in the early years. This does not preclude oral-aural training and assistive technology. With a strong first language (a sign language), the child can become bilingual (with the written form of the ambient spoken language and, perhaps, the spoken form), accruing the benefits of bilingualism.

We have published in medical journals, addressing primary care physicians, in a journal with a spiritual-leader readership, and in a health-law journal. Articles in progress address medical educators and practitioners. Team members present findings at conferences, work on lobbying and legislative efforts with the National Association of the Deaf, and spread the word at conferences of target audiences. We share our work in Word format, so that anyone can easily appropriate it for our common interests. One of our articles has been downloaded over 27,000 times (as of April 2014), and we are asked to consult with committees in other countries as they draft national policies.

Bilingualism: it’s something that kids are totally capable of, although it’s hard to realize this if you’re a monolingual adult. 

masooonderulo:

things that should not concern u:
- the length of a woman’s skirt
- the tightness of a woman’s top
- how many people a woman has slept with

things that should concern u:
- america’s gun laws
- that u haven’t petted enough dogs today
- harry potter named a kid albus severus